How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth


How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

Are you making bone broth yet?

Well, it’s something you should look into if you haven’t. Packed full of amino acids, gut healing nutrients, and minerals like magnesium, potassium, and calcium, it’s crazy beneficial for your bone health, digestion, and even contains anti-inflammatory components. Plus, when you make it at home instead of buying it, you save SO much money and you have all the control over the quality of ingredients.

My favorite way to make bone broth is with the slow cooker method. When using bones from animals with higher fat content like beef, lamb, or pork, you’ll notice that you get a good amount of fat in the broth. I love fat, but I usually don’t like to drink it in my broth. One way to deal with this is to place the broth in the fridge overnight. As the broth chills, the fat rises to the top and hardens, making it easy to skim it off with a spoon or a spatula.

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

I like to save the skimmed fat from the broth in a separate container because there’s no way I’m throwing away something so nutritious that gives us sustainable, nourishing energy.

However, the fat in this form is hard to use in cooking, and it goes bad quickly because the moisture content is still high from the broth. To make it last longer and to use it as a cooking oil without having it splatter everywhere, you have to cook off the moisture. You can do this on the stove top, but if you know me at all, you know I like to use the slow cooker.

Depending on how much fat comes out of the broth, I usually save it in the freezer until I have enough (usually after 2-3 batches of bone broth). And once I do, I defrost it in the fridge then throw it all in the slow cooker.

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

Leaving the lid slightly ajar, I cook it on low for 5-6 hours so all the liquid moisture can cook off. Afterwards you are left with just the delicious fat that you can use for frying, stir-frying, and baking. One of the added benefits of animal fats is that they are highly saturated so they can be used safely in high heat cooking.

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

Pour into a glass jar, and once it cools, screw on the lid and store in the fridge. It’ll harden, and turn beautifully creamy and white. With this method, it’ll keep for months in the fridge!

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

 How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. After making bone broth, place the broth in a large pot or container and place in the fridge overnight or at least 5 hours.
  2. As the broth chills, the fat will float to the top and harden. Skim off the fat with a spoon or a spatula. Don't worry if there are bone bits and some broth attached to the fat,.
  3. Save the fat in the freezer until you have at least a cup of fat to render (about 2-3 batches of bone broth).
  4. If your fat is frozen, defrost in the refrigerator.
  5. Place all the fat in the slow cooker, set it on low for 6 hrs. Leave the lid slightly ajar so the liquid can cook off and evaporate.
  6. Once finished, double up a cheesecloth over a funnel to strain into a glass jar.
  7. Let it cool to room temperature completely before screwing on the lid and storing in the fridge.**
Notes
**It's important to keep the lid off until the fat is completely cooled to avoid any moisture that may cause the fat to go bad quickly.

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth - Paleo Gluten Free Whole30


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