Tag Archives: beef

Moroccan Meatballs with Creamy Dipping Sauce

Moroccan MeatballsHi friends! I feel like I’ve been traveling SO MUCH recently. Last weekend, C and I visited Denver and Boulder, and it was such an amazing trip. For someone who loves to hike and eat good food, they offered the best of both. I kept talking about how we would move to Boulder if it was warm all year round and if it was next to the beach. Looks like we’ll be staying in California, but nevertheless, I absolutely loved both cities. The mountains were so breathtakingly beautiful, and it was so easy for me to find gluten-free, dairy-free EVERYTHING!

As much as I enjoyed all the food and adventures, I’m so happy to be back to cuddle with my dogs and eat home-cooked meals. No matter how delicious and healthy restaurant foods are, my digestion and body work and feel so much better eating at home. And I actually thought about these meatballs while I was there!

Moroccan Meatballs

Moroccan Meatballs

Moroccan MeatballsIf you decide to make these Moroccan meatballs, it’s EXTREMELY important you make the sauce as well. I mean, the meatballs are yummy on their own, but the creamy dipping sauce seriously makes it STELLAR. I know I sound a bit dramatic (what else is new?), but I’m serious! I made extra of the sauce and ended up putting it on everything I ate until it ran out.

Also, these meatballs taste great grilled as well. I’ve cooked them both ways: on the grill and in the oven, and I think I actually like the grilled version better! Keep in mind that they may lose their round, circular shape if you do decide to grill them. If you don’t care about that like me, then this recipe is a good one enjoy at a barbecue! 

Moroccan Meatballs

Moroccan Meatballs

Moroccan Meatballs
Moroccan Meatballs with Creamy Dipping Sauce
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Serves: about 12 meatballs
Ingredients
Dipping Sauce
  • ¼ cup paleo mayonnaise
  • 3 tbsp almond milk (or any dairy-free milk)
  • Zest and juice from ½ lemon
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
  • 2 tsp freshly chopped cilantro
  • 2 tsp freshly chopped parsley
  • Sea salt, to taste
Moroccan Meatballs
  • 1lb ground bison or beef
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ cup packed parsley leaves, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp ground allspice
  • ½ tsp ground coriander
  • ½ tsp chili powder
  • ¼ tsp ground cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper
Instructions
Dipping Sauce
  1. Mix all ingredients in a small bowl.
  2. Chill until ready to use.
Moroccan Meatballs
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Mix together all ingredients in a large bowl, combining everything evenly with your hands. Careful not to overwork the meat.
  3. Form in to 1½ inch balls.
  4. Place the meatballs on a baking sheet, then bake for 20 minutes until golden and cooked through.
  5. Serve dipping sauce on the side, or drizzled on top of the meatballs.
Notes
You can also grill these meatballs. Preheat the grill to medium high, then grill for 10-15 minutes, while turning every 2-3 minutes until they are cooked through.

Paleo Moroccan Meatballs with Creamy Dipping Sauce

Homemade Beef Jerky for Dogs

raw dog treat

If you know me at all or follow me on Snapchat, you know that I love our little pooches like they are my babies. I do my best to use the best quality ingredients when it comes to cooking and eating at home, and the same goes for our dogs. I have posted before about how we feed our dogs a raw meat diet, and while I believe this is still the ideal diet, this has changed because C and I love to travel so much and it was too much of a hassle to worry about while we were away. Also, it wasn’t working great for Sally, our shih tzu, so we have switched it up to high quality grain-free dehydrated raw kibble while still supplementing with eggs, bones, liver, and raw meat occasionally.

When it comes to treats, I’ve found that there are also many great quality products that we can buy but they are quite expensive if you want the ones with just 1 ingredient in them (high quality meat) without any kind of fillers and grains. I realized that making them at home is a much better option that’s both healthy and economical. Luckily for us, our local farmers market has a meat vendor that sells ground up grass fed raw food for dogs which includes beef meat, bones and various organs like hearts, livers, and kidneys. I’ve bought them previously to supplement their food, but I realized I could use them to make homemade beef jerky for them!

raw dog treat recipe

raw dog treat recipe

raw dog treat

If you can’t find a mixture like this one, you can just use ground beef or make your own mix after buying the parts separately. All these various parts contain different nutrients that are so beneficial and the dogs go crazy for them. Just like humans, it’s important for the dogs to eat all parts of the animal for the maximum nutrient profile. You don’t always need to get grass fed, but if you have the option and the means, I think it’s worth getting. After all, the dogs give us so much happiness in our lives, why wouldn’t we want to give them the best stuff so they can be healthy even as they get older?

raw dog treat

raw dog treat

raw dog treat

raw dog treat

Just a warning, these treats will induce those hard-to-resist “please, may I have some more??” faces (case in point: photo below). It makes me happy that even if I do give in and give them a few extra pieces of the jerky, they are eating a nutrient-dense and healthy treat that supports their development and nutrition. Just like humans, the food the dogs eat matters so much for their well-being!

Homemade Beef Jerky for Dogs

Homemade Beef Jerky for Dogs
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Ingredients
  • 1 lb mixture of ground beef, organ meats, and bones (you can use just ground beef as well)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven 130 degrees F or to its lowest setting.
  2. Place the meat mixture on a parchment paper and use your hands or a greased rolling pin to flatten out the meat to about ⅛ inch thick.
  3. Use a blunt knife to score the meat into a checkerboard pattern so you can later break them into bite sized pieces.
  4. Place the entire thing on a baking sheet, and dehydrate in the oven for 8 hours.
  5. Take out of the oven and tilt the baking sheet carefully over the sink to drain out any grease that seeped out.
  6. Break the beef into pieces along the previously scored lines, then place them in a single layer on a cooling rack on top of a fresh baking sheet.
  7. Place back in the oven for 4-5 more hours. There may be more drippings that fall into the baking sheet.
  8. Store at room temperature for 3 weeks, or keep in the fridge if planning to keep longer than that.

 Paleo Homemade Dog Treat Beef Jerky

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

Are you making bone broth yet?

Well, it’s something you should look into if you haven’t. Packed full of amino acids, gut healing nutrients, and minerals like magnesium, potassium, and calcium, it’s crazy beneficial for your bone health, digestion, and even contains anti-inflammatory components. Plus, when you make it at home instead of buying it, you save SO much money and you have all the control over the quality of ingredients.

My favorite way to make bone broth is with the slow cooker method. When using bones from animals with higher fat content like beef, lamb, or pork, you’ll notice that you get a good amount of fat in the broth. I love fat, but I usually don’t like to drink it in my broth. One way to deal with this is to place the broth in the fridge overnight. As the broth chills, the fat rises to the top and hardens, making it easy to skim it off with a spoon or a spatula.

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

I like to save the skimmed fat from the broth in a separate container because there’s no way I’m throwing away something so nutritious that gives us sustainable, nourishing energy.

However, the fat in this form is hard to use in cooking, and it goes bad quickly because the moisture content is still high from the broth. To make it last longer and to use it as a cooking oil without having it splatter everywhere, you have to cook off the moisture. You can do this on the stove top, but if you know me at all, you know I like to use the slow cooker.

Depending on how much fat comes out of the broth, I usually save it in the freezer until I have enough (usually after 2-3 batches of bone broth). And once I do, I defrost it in the fridge then throw it all in the slow cooker.

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

Leaving the lid slightly ajar, I cook it on low for 5-6 hours so all the liquid moisture can cook off. Afterwards you are left with just the delicious fat that you can use for frying, stir-frying, and baking. One of the added benefits of animal fats is that they are highly saturated so they can be used safely in high heat cooking.

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

Pour into a glass jar, and once it cools, screw on the lid and store in the fridge. It’ll harden, and turn beautifully creamy and white. With this method, it’ll keep for months in the fridge!

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

 How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. After making bone broth, place the broth in a large pot or container and place in the fridge overnight or at least 5 hours.
  2. As the broth chills, the fat will float to the top and harden. Skim off the fat with a spoon or a spatula. Don't worry if there are bone bits and some broth attached to the fat,.
  3. Save the fat in the freezer until you have at least a cup of fat to render (about 2-3 batches of bone broth).
  4. If your fat is frozen, defrost in the refrigerator.
  5. Place all the fat in the slow cooker, set it on low for 6 hrs. Leave the lid slightly ajar so the liquid can cook off and evaporate.
  6. Once finished, double up a cheesecloth over a funnel to strain into a glass jar.
  7. Let it cool to room temperature completely before screwing on the lid and storing in the fridge.**
Notes
**It's important to keep the lid off until the fat is completely cooled to avoid any moisture that may cause the fat to go bad quickly.

How to Save the Fat from Bone Broth - Paleo Gluten Free Whole30