Tag Archives: beet

Pink Beet Latte

If you are a fan of beets, you’ll fall in love with this delicious and naturally sweet beet latte! 

Paleo Vegan Beet Latte

Happy Friday, you beautiful souls! It’s about to get REAL over here, because I’m picking my parents up from the airport today, and then we are headed to Mexico on Sunday to start my wedding week. I’m so excited, but to be honest, I’ve been quite stressed out with some last minute planning and scrambling.

I think I’ll be in a much better state once we are there and enjoying the sun and the beach. However, with the amount of cortisol I’ve been dealing with, my liver needs some extra love these days. And the best way to do that? Enter the beet.

Paleo Vegan Beet Latte

Beets are so high in antioxidants, and have the power to eliminate toxins from the liver and improve the digestion of fats. I’ve been a fan for a long time, and when I tried out a beet latte at a LA coffeeshop a few weeks back, I knew I had to recreate it at home!

I was skeptical about the combination of beet and milk at first, but I’m quite obsessed with how decadent, creamy, and naturally sweet this pink beet latte tastes. And the gorgeous color just can’t be beat (or beet?)!

I have talked about in the past that I like to give up coffee for a week about once every month because I hate feeling like I’m addicted to or dependent on any one food. Well, this beet latte is a delicious substitute during those times and I still feel like I’m enjoying a hot yummy drink, without feeling deprived. Plus, I love that it’s doing the opposite of coffee: nourishing my liver and digestion instead of taxing it.

If you never tried beet latte before and are totally weirded out by it, I encourage you to try it! I think you’ll be surprised how yummy it tastes, and your body will love you for it.

Paleo Vegan Beet Latte Paleo Vegan Beet Latte

Pink Beet Latte
 
Prep time
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Ingredients
  • 1 medium beetroot
  • ¼ inch fresh ginger
  • ½ tsp pure vanilla extract
  • ¼ tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1½ cup unsweetened non-dairy milk (I use almond)
  • Optional: 1 tsp honey
Instructions
  1. Place beetroot in a saucepan and submerge with water. Bring to boil over medium high heat, and turn down heat to low and simmer for 30 minutes until you can easily pierce the beet with a fork.
  2. Drain the beet, let it cool for 15 minutes, and peel it.
  3. Place the peeled beet in a blender with ginger, vanilla extract, and cinnamon. Set aside.
  4. Heat milk in a saucepan over medium heat until it begins to simmer. Remove from heat.
  5. Pour ½ cup of the milk into the blender with the beet and blend well until smooth, about 5 minutes Pour into a mug.
  6. Use a milk frother on the rest of the milk or blend in the blender to until it gets foamy.
  7. Gently pour the foamed milk into the mug over the beet mixture, while stirring with a spoon.
  8. Stir in honey, if using, and enjoy!

Beet Kvass

beet kvass

I can’t believe I never knew about beet kvass until a few months ago. I absolutely love beets and fermented foods, soooooo beet kvass should have been on my radar WAY before. I’m so happy to have found out about it now, because this fermented beet drink is one of the easiest fermented foods to make and contains so many health benefits!

What is beet kvass?

Beet kvass is a fermented drink originating from eastern Europe. In fact, Russians have been enjoying kvass for at least one thousand years. According to Weston A. Price foundation’s article:

“Russian soldiers took a ladle full of kvass before venturing from their barracks onto the Moscow streets during a cholera epidemic. Because kvass protects against infectious disease, there is no worry about sharing the glass… Folk medicine values beets and beet kvass for their liver cleansing properties and beet kvass is widely used in cancer therapy in Europe. Anecdotal reports indicate that beet kvass is an excellent therapy for chronic fatigue, chemical sensitivities, allergies and digestive problems.”

Beets themselves have so many health benefits, and according to Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions, beet kvass is:

“valuable for its medicinal qualities and as a digestive aid. Beets are loaded with nutrients. One glass morning and night is an excellent blood tonic, promotes regularity, aids digestion, alkalizes the blood, cleanses the liver and is a good treatment for kidney stones and other ailments.”

beet kvass

beet kvass

beet kvass

I’ve been drinking 1/2 cup of beet kvass every morning and night, and I love how much it has been helping with my digestion. Also, if you have trouble digesting fats, beets are one of the best foods that thin the bile. I highly recommend you try out beet kvass because it costs pennies to make, but the health benefits are so great and numerous!

beet kvass

How does it taste?

Slightly sweet, slightly salty, slightly sour, and very beet-y. If you are not a fan of beets, I don’t know if you’ll love beet kvass. Even for beet lovers, it may take some time to get used to. The first time I made it, I didn’t like how salty it tasted and that’s why I adjusted the original recipe to use less salt. SOME salt is necessary to avoid the formation of mold.

If you have a hard time stomaching it, you can try diluting it with water or soda water and even add some lemon juice until you get used to the taste. To be honest, I drank it more for its medicinal properties than its flavor at first. Now that I’ve been drinking it everyday, I actually love it and look forward to drinking it every day. Just pour into a wine class and pretend that you are drinking a fancy cocktail to make it more fun!

beet kvass

beet kvass

beet kvass

Beet Kvass
 
Prep time
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Total time
 
Ingredients
  • ½ gallon glass jar
  • 3 medium organic beets
  • ¼ cup sauerkraut juice
  • 1½ tsp sea salt
Instructions
  1. Wash and chop beets into ½ inch cubes.
  2. Place beets, sauerkraut juice, and sea salt into the glass jar.
  3. Pour filtered water into the jar, leaving 1 inch at the top.
  4. Stir well, and cover with a cheesecloth.
  5. Leave at room temperature for 48 hours to ferment.
  6. Taste the liquid and if it's fermented enough, transfer to the fridge.
  7. Drink ½-1 cup each day.
Notes
You may repeat the process with the same beet cubes 1 more time. The resulting kvass will be less strong than the first and you may need to ferment for longer (about 3 days), but you will get the same health benefits. Discard the beet cubes after the 2nd fermentation.

Paleo Vegan Whole30 Beet Kvass

Beet Deviled Eggs

beet deviled eggs

Valentine’s Day is coming up, and since C and I are the only couple in the world that do not enjoy sweets regularly and we never order dessert when we go out to eat, I didn’t think it would make sense to post a dessert recipe. I only crave sweets once in a while, but I’ve been avoiding sugary recipes recently because my Candida symptoms tend to flare up if I overindulge.

So I made one of my favorite snack recipes into pretty pink to get into the Valentine’s Day spirit. Not only are these deviled eggs delicious, they contain so many beneficial nutrients and healthy fats. If you are a fan of beets like I am, then this recipe is right up your alley.  

beet deviled eggs

beet deviled eggs

By the way, I think beets are so freakin’ cool. I know some people hate them, but I think they are beautiful and delicious. And I love that they have the power to make everything they touch into a red and pink hot mess. So fun. Of course, that is until it’s time to clean up.

beet deviled eggs

These deviled eggs are a touch sweet from the cooked beets and their flavor complements perfectly with the eggs. If you are cooking at home on Valentine’s Day and looking to make a snack or appetizer, these are a fun and festive option!

We don’t have any plans yet, but that probably means we’ll decide at the last minute if we should go out to eat or just cook something at home. We are clearly not planners when it comes to this sort of thing. What will you be doing? Whether you have a special someone in your life, spending it with your friends, or just spending time alone, hope you have a day full of love and care for others and yourself. That’s what it’s really about anyway, amiriiight?

flowers 

beet deviled eggs 

beet deviled eggs
Beet Deviled Eggs
 
Prep time
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Total time
 
Ingredients
  • 8 eggs
  • 1 medium beet
  • 3 tbsp paleo mayonnaise
  • 2 tbsp dijon mustard
  • Salt and pepper, to taste (omit pepper if avoiding nightshades)
  • Fresh basil, for garnish
Instructions
For the boiled eggs**
  1. Bring water to a boil in a saucepan.
  2. Gently lower the eggs into the water so they don't break, and let it come to a boil again. Once it does, lower the heat, and let the eggs simmer for 11 minutes.
  3. Prepare a large bowl with an ice bath.
  4. Once the eggs are done cooking, place them in the ice bath for at least 15 minutes.
  5. Peel the eggs under cold running water.
For the beet deviled eggs
  1. While the eggs cool, place the beet in a saucepan and cover with water.
  2. Bring to a boil, and lower the heat to simmer for 30 minutes, or until the beet can easily be pierced with a knife.
  3. Cool the beet in cold water, then peel it under running water.
  4. Cut the beet into small pieces then place into a food processor.
  5. Cut the boiled and peeled eggs in half lengthwise.
  6. Take out the yolks and add it to the food processor.
  7. Add mayo, dijon mustard, salt and pepper, and process until fully combined and creamy.
  8. Fill the egg whites with the mixture evenly. Sprinkle with basil for garnish.
Notes
**There are many ways to cook hard-boiled eggs, but I found that this method makes the best, easy-to-peels eggs. You can boil it any way you like that works best for you!

Beet Deviled Eggs - Paleo Gluten Free Whole30