Tag Archives: radish

Daikon Radish Fries

AIP Paleo Daikon Radish Fries

Hello from LA! We are finally at our final destination on our Pacific Coast Highway road trip and I’m seriously loving all the palm trees, sunshine, and the warm weather. I’d rather not got back to NorCal but we’ll be heading back on January 1st. At least that’s the plan for now.

I also plan to do a blog post on this trip with my mom and how we handled being on an AIP diet for almost 2 weeks while on the road, so stay tuned! In the meantime, I’m excited to share this delicious daikon radish fries with you. These are AIP as well, and I made them so my mom and I can enjoy them together.

AIP Paleo Daikon Radish Fries

AIP Paleo Daikon Radish Fries

AIP Paleo Daikon Radish Fries

If you are even a little bit normal, fries are the best, most addicting things ever. I can go to town on them, but I don’t love the crappy oils that they cook them in at restaurants and I can feel the brain fog afterwards. So I try to make them at home often, and these daikon radish fries came together the other day when I had a giant daikon radish leftover after making my slow cooker Korean short ribs.

AIP Paleo Daikon Radish Fries

AIP Paleo Daikon Radish Fries

AIP Paleo Daikon Radish Fries

If they look slightly burnt, that’s all good. That just means they crisped up nicely and will give that delicious crunch. My only complaint was that I didn’t make enough! These were dangerously addicting and were gone in no time. My mom couldn’t stop raving about how good they were.

If you are looking for a tasty and addicting fries recipes that’s healthy and lower in carbs, you need to make these daikon radish fries because they are awesome!

AIP Paleo Daikon Radish Fries

Daikon Radish Fries
 
Prep time
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Ingredients
  • 1 large daikon radish
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil, softened
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Use a shark knife to cut the radish into fries, about ½ inch thick and 3 inches long.
  3. Soak under water for 20-30 minutes to get rid of excess starch. Drain and pay dry.
  4. Place the radish fries in a large bowl with coconut oil, salt and ½ tsp thyme leaves. Toss until the fries are coated in seasoning.
  5. Lay the fries on a baking sheet in a single layer, making sure the pan isn't too crowded.
  6. Bake for 50 minutes, flipping the fries half way through, until the fries are darker in color and crispy.*
  7. Sprinkle with the rest of the thyme leaves and eat with your favorite dipping sauce!
Notes
*Every oven is different, so make sure to watch the fries closely and adjust the time accordingly.

Paleo Gluten Free Whole30 AIP Daikon Radish Fries

Asian Daikon Noodles

asian daikon radish noodlesasian daikon radish noodles

I’ve been loving daikon radish recently. My favorite way to eat them is in their raw, fermented form in kimchi, but they can be baked, sauteed, shredded in salads, or even be eaten straight-up raw dipped in guacamole like carrots.

My recent discovery was that they spiralize beautifully and can replace noodles in most noodle-containing dishes. However, I grew up eating daikon in Korean dishes, so I think they are the most appropriate in Asian cuisines. 

asian daikon radish noodles

 

asian daikon radish noodles

Creating this recipe was a thoughtless process that came together as I started putting in my favorite stir-fry ingredients. I feel like that’s how most great dishes are made: just going with your taste buds and gut. It’s a quick and simple meal that tastes flavorful and expensive, which I can always get behind. It’s ideal for any low-carbers, gluten-fearers, or just daikon radish lovers, which should cover most of you (especially the last one even if you may not know it yet).

Question of the day: If zucchini noodles are called zoodles… then can I call these doodles?

asian daikon radish noodlesasian daikon radish noodlesasian daikon radish noodles

5.0 from 1 reviews
ASIAN DAIKON NOODLES
 
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Ingredients
  • 1 lb daikon radish
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tsp coconut oil
  • ½ lb grass-fed ground beef
  • 2 medium carrots, grated
  • 4 oz mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 head bok choy, cut in half separating the stem portion from the leaves
  • 2 tbsp gluten-free tamari sauce or coconut aminos
  • 2 tsp fish sauce
  • 1 tsp miso
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 green onions, chopped
  • Sesame seeds
  • Salt and pepper, to taste (omit pepper if avoiding nightshades)
Instructions
  1. Using a spiralizer or a vegetable slicer, slice the daikon radish into noodles and put in a bowl.
  2. Salt the daikon radish noodles and toss evenly, and let it sit for 30 minutes.
  3. In the meantime whisk the eggs.
  4. Heat a tsp of coconut oil to medium high heat in the heavy bottomed skillet.
  5. Pour the whisked eggs so they spread out into a thin layer. Sprinkle salt and pepper.
  6. Cook for about 3-4 minutes, then flip it over, and cook for another 3-4 minutes.
  7. Transfer to a cutting board and and slice the eggs thinly into ¼ inch strips.
  8. Cut them again so each strip is about 2 inches long. Set aside.
  9. In a small bowl, whisk together tamari sauce, fish sauce, and miso until the miso breaks down evenly into the mixture.
  10. Heat another tsp of coconut oil into the heated pan.
  11. Add the grated carrots and chopped mushrooms into the pan, add a pinch of salt, and cook for 3 minute until they soften.
  12. Add the stem part of the bok choy to the pan and stir fry for a another 3 minutes.
  13. Once the bok choy stems soften, add ground beef with a sprinkle of salt and pepper, breaking it up as it cooks through.
  14. When the beef browns up, lower the heat to medium and add tamari-miso sauce and the top leaves portion of the bok choy.
  15. Go back to the daikon radish noodles. They should have softened up at this point and sweated out quite a bit of water. Squeeze out and discard the water from the noodles.
  16. Add the noodles into the pan with beef and vegetables, and cook while stirring for 3-4 minutes.
  17. Remove from heat, and add a tbsp of sesame oil and stir together.
  18. Plate the noodles, and garnish with a sprinkle of sesame seeds and chopped green onions.

Paleo Gluten Free Whole30 Asian Daikon Noodles

Carrot & Radish Kimchi (Kkadugi)

Carrot & Radish Kimchi (Kkadugi)Carrot & Radish Kimchi (Kkadugi)
My favorite fermented food hands-down is kimchi. I grew up eating it, and it goes well with almost everything. Not only that, there are so many amazing health benefits in eating fermented foods like kimchi. They promote digestion because of the healthy bacteria like lactobacilli and probiotics, aid in weight loss, boost immunity, and some studies show that they prevent cancer.

While cabbage kimchi is a more popular and well-known version in America, the traditional process of making it is time consuming with a long wait time for the fermentation. I got no patience for that. With radish kimchi, called kkakdugi in Korean,  you need less ingredients, and it can be fermented in a day or 2 so you can enjoy it soon after you make it.
Carrot & Radish Kimchi (Kkadugi)Carrot & Radish Kimchi (Kkadugi)
Carrot & Radish Kimchi (Kkadugi)I add carrots because I love pickled carrots, but you can use only radishes if you want to go for the more traditional route. I like to switch it up from time to time. This recipe has a small amount of sugar added, but this gets eaten away as the kkadugi gets fermented. You won’t taste the sugar at all at the end.
Carrot & Radish Kimchi (Kkadugi)Carrot & Radish Kimchi (Kkadugi)
With its perfect crunch and spiciness, you’ll find it seriously addicting. I eat it almost every day with my meals and I feel like I’m less bloated afterwards. Make fermented, raw foods an everyday part of your diet for optimal health!
Carrot & Radish Kimchi (Kkadugi)Carrot & Radish Kimchi (Kkadugi)

CARROT & RADISH KIMCHI (KKAGDUGI)
 
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Author:
Ingredients
  • 2 lbs Korean or daikon radishes
  • 1 lb carrots
  • 1 tbsp & 1 tsp sea salt
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 inch ginger, finely grated
  • ⅓ cup preservative & MSG-free fish sauce (can sub for coconut aminos or tamari sauce)
  • ½ cup Korean coarse red pepper flakes (Add more or less depending on your spice level)
  • 4 stalks green onions, chopped
Instructions
  1. Rinse the radishes and carrots and cut off any small hairs on the skin. (You can also peel the skin, I leave it on.)
  2. Cut the radishes and carrots into bite sized cubes and put them in a large bowl.
  3. Coat the mixture with sea salt evenly.
  4. Let it rest for 30 minutes so they have time to sweat.
  5. Drain out most of the juice but leave about 2 tbsp to ¼ cup in the mixture.
  6. Add minced garlic, grated ginger, fish sauce, red pepper flakes, and chopped onions.
  7. Mix everything well so the seasonings are evenly coated.
  8. Transfer to a glass jar with an airtight lid, pressing down the mixture gently as you pour it in.
  9. Close the lid and let it sit outside the fridge at room temperature out of sunlight for 24-48 hours while it ferments.
  10. It's ready when you open the lid and you see small bubbles escaping off the top and the kkadugi has a strong, sour smell.
  11. Store in the fridge and eat it with EVERYTHING.

Paleo Gluten Free Whole30 Carrot & Radish Kimchi (Kkadugi)